We currently live in a day and age where environmental progressivism is “cool to like” more than ever. Therefore it is good for the image of a company to be environmentally progressive. This is why we often hear about companies that “go green” by finding ways to be more environmentally friendly with their practices. Whether it’s Coca Cola pledging to “give back” all water they use by 2020, or the automotive industry churning out hybrid vehicles, or BP spending billions to make us forget that Deepwater Horizon ever happened, pretty much everywhere you look there is evidence that major companies care a lot about being seen as “green.”

A famous figure in the world of sports once said “Winning isn’t everything; it’s the only thing.” Switch the word “winning” with “profit” and you’d have the perfect slogan for big business. If pretty much every major corporation is tripping over themselves to at least appear green-friendly, it goes without saying that such a practice is profitable.

So why is going green such a money-maker? The first and most obvious reason is image. Approval ratings aren’t just for politicians. Corporations, government agencies, and faith based organizations spend untold billions every year on public relations campaigns. If a company gives the appearance of being progressive and visionary, people are more likely to view them favorably, which tends to result in a certain percentage of customer decisions breaking their way that might not have otherwise.

Another reason is because going green also usually means consuming fewer resources, which lowers costs. In the aforementioned case of Coca-Cola, their real motivation behind their pledge to be water neutral is rooted in the fact that water cost is currently the company’s #1 industrial expenditure. By finding a way to create beverages while using less water, it’s not only good for image but also saves a lot of money. And depending on the water needs of the community surrounding the factory, it could be good for the environment too. This is especially noteworthy in most of the Western U.S. where drought has become a major issue over the past decade.

When Green Flush’s founder, Ken Earlywine, designed his first restrooms for Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, conserving water was a necessity. Most campgrounds and beaches in need of restroom services were in remote locations without access to sewer, electrical or water lines. Simply out of necessity, these toilets were given a special design to flush using far less water than a standard toilet. Otherwise, somebody would have to make long trips constantly to refill the water tanks and pump watery sewage.

This original staple of our Green Flush Restroom is still a part of our identity today, with our current flush restroom consuming less than one tenth of the water per use of a typical flush toilet. Water used for hand washing is later recycled into the flush tank, meaning that no water is wasted. Our restrooms also operate off of solar energy. Our buildings also do not require disturbing the ground, which can be a major consideration in situations where environmental regulations or cultural sensitivities make digging trenches difficult, expensive, or even impossible.

By conserving water, re-using water, conserving energy, and providing a restroom option that doesn’t disturb the ground, we not only allow customers to have flush restrooms where they previously could not exist, but we are saving both customers and the environment resources in the process. Less water being used means less water hauling and less pumping, which means less maintenance cost. We take pride in our environmentally progressive products, but even if you don’t care about the image benefits of going green, there are very real cost savings just the same.

Contact Green Flush at (360) 718-7595 to talk to one of our experts!